Skip to main menu Skip to content
Ryerson University has changed its name. Find out more.
Information on Library resources and services for: Students | Instructors | Researchers

News

Winter term notice: January 7 to January 30, 2022

For the health and safety of students and staff, the University has decided to hold classes virtually until January 30, 2022. 

Library hours and operations will shift back to primarily virtual delivery for most academic programming and services from January 7, 2022 until January 30, 2022

For more information, see:

Library hours

Students

Instructors

Researchers

Happy Holiday!

Happy holidays! We hope everyone has a safe, healthy and restful holiday break.

Reminder the Library is closed December 24, 2021 to January 6, 2022 inclusive. 

The Library will reopen Jan. 7, 2022. Hours and operations will shift back to primarily virtual delivery for most academic programming and services.

For more information, see:

Library hours

Students

Instructors

Researchers

 

Virtual University Library tour! January 18, 2022

 

Come tour the University Library and learn how librarians can work with you to transform ideas into questions, take those questions and help you find useful academic resources, take those resources and show you how to navigate and apply them to your work!
Tour highlights will include the Library’s Geospatial Map & Data Centre, the Library Isaac Olowolafe Jr. Digital Media Experience Lab, and so much more.
Sign up now!

 

Last day to request items for scan and deliver, and print pick up

Scan and Deliver Service

Last day to request: Friday, December 17, 2021.  See Library Hours  for more information.

Closed for the Mid-Year Break: Friday, December 24, 2021 to Thursday, January 6, 2022 inclusive.

 

Print Pick Up

Last day to request: Friday, December 18, 2020.  See Library Hours  for more information.

Closed for the Mid-Year Break: Friday, December 24, 2021 to Thursday, January 6, 2022 inclusive.

Library Withold – Fall term 2021

We hope everyone is having a successful exam period – the fall term is now complete!

  • Please clear any outstanding fines and return overdue items as soon as possible. Head to the renewals page to see if you have overdue items or fines greater than $25. Students with fines greater than $25 will not be able to view their grades until their accounts are cleared.
  • All fines can be paid to the Library by telephone, either by VISA, MasterCard, American Express or with your OneCard – please contact us at access@ryerson.ca to arrange a call in time when on site staff are available.  We do not accept personal cheques.
  • We understand that this is a trying time, if you have questions or concerns about fines or overdue items, please contact Library Circulation at access@ryerson.ca .

On a personal note from the Library, we wish you and your loved ones a healthy and restful holiday break.

Finding the Soul in Data:  Learn to unpack the data and reveal the untold stories

Dialogues for change: RE: Thinking Politics

Upcoming Event: Finding the Soul in Data:  Learn to unpack the data and reveal the untold stories

Public opinion polling data can be used to tell a story. But, how is that story told and who tells it? Empower yourself by learning to unpack these data stories and reveal their political and personal meaning.

This workshop will look at public opinion data sets commissioned by Apathy is Boring to explore how stories are constructed using data. There will be particular focus given to the political views and actions of young Canadians.  

Interested in journalism or storytelling, activism or politics, how to make sense of current issues and the political landscape? Join us on Nov. 24!

Date: Wed., Nov. 24
Time: 3 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Registration now 


Dialogues for change: RE: Thinking Politics

The University Library and Democratic Engagement Exchange at the Faculty of Arts are partnering to deliver a year long series of programming for the university community that aims to instill and normalize participation in democratic processes and conversations. 

Civic literacy, and the literacy of listening, are guiding principles of the series and will be used to establish the framework through which conversations are grounded. The overall goal is to connect these key concepts  to our democratic institutions. The series will work to unpack power and politics, and deconstruct contentious language that inevitably arises in many discussions about politics.

PDF Download Problems: Cloudflare errors

We currently are experiencing access issues to PDFs of articles from a number of academic publishers.

Example of CloudFlare Error message screen capture
Example of CloudFlare Error Message

We have identified and reported this error for the following publishers.

  • American Chemical Society
  • Wiley
  • AIAA
  • Taylor and Francis

If you see this error with a different publishers please report to erm@ryerson.ca.

Workarounds

Some workarounds while we wait for publishers to find a solution for this problem:

  1. See if there is a HTML version of the article available. If you need to save it, try printing it out to PDF from the browser.
  2. Look for another source for the article by searching for publication using journal search. Search for the journal by Journal title and then search for the article by Volume, Issue and Page numbers.


  3. If you are trying to access the article via linking menu, try to Select a Different Source if available.

Who Gets Heard? A Dialogues for Change: RE: Thinking Politics Event

 

 

On November 18, join the University Library and the Democracy Engagement Exchange for a panel discussion on reframing politics and how we make our voices heard.

Elections are supposed to represent our collective voices, but some voices are clearly louder than others. How do we get heard at these critical moments?


Guest panel:

Yonis Hassan, CEO and co-founder (with Noah ‘40’ Shebib) of Justice Fund is upending traditional conceptions of philanthropy. 

Samantha Reusch, executive director of Apathy is Boring is making political engagement cool again nation-wide 

Sam Tecle, assistant professor, Department of Sociology, is bringing new focus to the ways in which resistance shapes and builds communities.

 

Register now

…….

 

Dialogues for Change: RE: Thinking Politics

The University Library and Democratic Engagement Exchange at the Faculty of Arts are partnering to deliver a year long series of programming for the university community that aims to instill and normalize participation in democratic processes and conversations. 

Civic literacy, and the literacy of listening, are guiding principles of the series and will be used to establish the framework through which conversations are grounded. The overall goal is to connect these key concepts  to our democratic institutions. The series will work to unpack power and politics, and deconstruct contentious language that inevitably arises in many discussions about politics.

 

 

Read Something, Watch Something, Do Something

Read Something, Watch Something

The University Library and Positive Space are collaborating in order to bring together a curated list of books, videos and more by Trans authors and on Trans research for Trans Awareness Month, accompanied by actions you can take to support a trans-inclusive environment.

Consider this list an invitation to participate in an asynchronous book club, with a variety of options. The broader community is welcomed to read and watch their choice of selections from this list, available for free to students, staff and faculty via the University Library.

Do Something

If you are inspired to act, learn how some librarians across Canada are speaking out against Trans-Exclusionary Radical Feminist (TERF) speech in libraries. Add your voice! Below are two more ways to get involved.

Increase Representation in Wikipedia

Wikipedia and other reference resources have lower levels of representation of notable trans people than of notable cis people. Take part in this month-long asynchronous Wikipedia-edit-a-thon by enhancing or creating Wikipedia pages featuring trans people. Taking part is simple: if you have never edited a Wikipedia page, here are some guidelines and instructions.

Eradicate Deadnaming and More

The University Library is working to eradicate disrespectful language from catalogue records.  Libraries across Canada follow controlled vocabularies and standards but when these standards are slow to remove offensive subject headings some libraries make decisions not to follow the instructions. The Cataloging lab is one space where this work is discussed & shared. Our University Library has made several changes. In order to create a more trans-inclusive campus environment we removed various subject headings and replaced them with:

  • Gender-nonconforming people
  • Transgender people
  • Two-spirit people

In addition to topical headings, the names of authors are controlled so as to be able to bring together variant forms/languages of a person’s name, which you can see in the metadata record for Malcolm X, for example.  Cataloguers can document personal and professional details about an author, including name changes.

Metadata records often include a great deal of valuable information about a person, yet libraries can also respect the wishes of creators by omitting information.  In the metadata record for Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama there is a Special Note informing cataloguers to leave her birthdate out of the metadata.

At this Library we will connect the links between names on request, and we will also remove links between works to avoid deadnaming, based on the direction of the author.  We welcome suggestions as to how we can build a welcoming and respectful space for research for everyone. If you are an author represented in our collection, let the University Library know how you would like to be represented by emailing: tgrover@ryerson.ca.

Apply now for the 2021/2022 Library Creators Grant!

The University Library’s annual DME Creators Grant supports undergraduate students who want to create innovative, sustainable, and digital experiences that address social equity issues.

Participants receive funding, access to Library resources and expertise, production training, and mentorship to bring their passion projects to life!

The Library is now accepting applications. Deadline for submissions is November 22, 2021

Visit the Library Creators Grant to learn more about past recipients, project and apply!