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Learn how to use the new academic search tool, Omni.

Author: TMU Libraries

From hospital hallways to campus classrooms: the 50th anniversary of amalgamation

In 1973 the face of nursing education would change in Ontario with the move of hospital schools of nursing into collegiate settings. The Ryerson School of Nursing (now the Daphne Cockwell School of Nursing DCSN) would merge with the schools from the Hospital for Sick Children, Women’s College Hospital, and the The Wellesley Hospital. This was the start of a close relationship between the DCSN and the Wellesley Hospital School of Nursing Alumnae Association (WHSNAA) that continues today.

In 2011, 13 years after the hospital’s closure, the WHSNAA gifted their expansive archival collection to TMU Archives. Along with the physical collection, the Alumnae association established an endowment to help offset the cost for the preservation and care of the materials.

On the left is Linda Cooper, Wellesley ’68 and Professor Emerita, Daphne Cockwell School of Nursing and on the right is Shirley Heard, Wellesley ’62 – Alumnae Association President. Also in the picture is a small part of the collection now housed in the Toronto Metropolitan University Archives. Photo courtesy of University Advancement.

In recognition of the 50th anniversary of the amalgamation and in celebration of the continuing relationship, the three groups, the WHSNAA, the DSCN and the University Archives, have partnered to create an anniversary exhibition. The physical display, housed in the DCSN administrative offices, features artifacts and photographs that give you a window into the history of the Wellesley Hospital School of Nursing, the WHSNAA, and the DSCN. The online component of the exhibit, consisting of two blogs, will take an in-depth look at the topics introduced in the physical exhibit.

Read the full post about the opening of the Wellesley Hospital, the birth of a nursing school, early nurse training, the evolution of the uniform, and convocation at the Wellesley Hospital School of Nursing on the Archives and Special Collections site.

 

Starting the research process? Learn to narrow your search and find what you need!

Embarking on a research project can be overwhelming. Knowing where to start, how to look for information and resources, and when to narrow your search can be daunting.

The good news is you’re not alone on your research journey. We are here to help! TMU Libraries has a number of research help options available to get you started. 

Research help is available in-person, online, in real-time with our chat service Ask Us, and by appointment. 

And, we’re also on YouTube. TMU subject librarians, Cecile Farnum, Fiona Kovacaj and Michelle Schwartz have collaborated to bring you a series of videos to get you started.

Check out these 3 short videos:

 

 

 

 

 

TMU Libraries will launch Omni on June 12: learn more about your new academic search tool!

On June 12, Toronto Metropolitan University Libraries will launch Omni, an academic search tool used by 18 Ontario university libraries and designed to bring library search and service functions together to provide a seamless, one-stop search experience for users. 

TMU Libraries has been diligently working behind the scenes to implement this new search tool. While the search function will go live June 12 on the Libraries’ website, the system’s full functionality will continue to be phased in throughout the summer. 

As a tool used by the majority of university libraries across the province, Omni fosters collaboration and facilitates the sharing of library collections. Once implementation is complete,  TMU students, faculty, researchers and staff will be able to search for articles, books, ebooks, journals and other resources in a variety of formats at TMU Libraries AND search and borrow material items from 18 Ontario university libraries from within Omni. 

So, what can you expect starting June 12? As we continue to introduce functionality throughout the summer, in June users will be able to use a new search interface. The functionality will be similar to the current system but you will notice:

  • Access to request items, place holds, check your account, customize your settings, and search TMU Libraries’ holding, will be done all in one place!
  • Academic resources (books, ebooks, journals, videos, etc.) continue to be easily searched through one search area. 
  • Loan periods for students and faculty will be longer: 120 Days for most materials (excluding Reserve Items), and 14 days for audio-visual materials.

Note: there will be minimal to no changes in course reserve requests

Have questions? Learn more

Omni partner libraries:

  • Algoma University
  • Brock University
  • Carleton University
  • University of Guelph
  • Lakehead University
  • Laurentian University
  • McMaster University
  • Nipissing University
  • OCAD University
  • University of Ontario Institute of Technology
  • University of Ottawa
  • Queen’s University
  • Trent University
  • University of Waterloo
  • Western University
  • Wilfrid Laurier University
  • University of Windsor
  • York University

Dean of Libraries Mark Robertson and colleagues receive 2023 Partnership Article Award

Congratulations to TMU’s Dean of Libraries Mark Robertson, Interim University Librarian, Thompson Rivers University Tania Gottschalk, and Assessment Librarian, University of Calgary Justine Wheeler on receiving the 2023 Partnership Article Award for their article, The CARL Library Impact Framework: A Logic Model Approach to Impact Assessment For Research Libraries

The paper discusses the Canadian Association of Research Libraries (CARL) Library Impact Framework (CLIF), which was released in December 2021. The article provides an overview of the framework, its genesis, intent, structure, and possibilities for its application in research libraries. Read the award-winning article in Partnership

How a digital archive is preserving Canada’s history of LGBTQ+ activism

 

As LGBTQ+ organizations across Canada gear up for a Rainbow Week of Action, May 16 and 17, TMU Librarian Michelle Schwartz, University of Ottawa Associate Professor and Canada Research Chair in Digital Humanities Constance Crompton, and University of Ottawa and TMU Postdoctoral Fellow Pascale Dangoisse, discuss how these events are part of a long history of LGBTQ+ campaigning and protest and the importance of making that history easily accessible online to help contemporary movements learn from previous generations of activists. Their Lesbian and Gay Liberation in Canada project highlights how feminist and queer practices can create meaningful change using digital methods and tools.

 

Read the full article in The Conversation

 

 

Remembering Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, Girls, Men, and Two-Spirit people: TMU Libraries hosts micro gallery

TMU Libraries has installed a micro gallery that acts as memorial to all Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, Girls, Men, and Two-Spirit people (MMIWGM2S). The gallery, located on the main floor of the Main Library, is comprised of books wrapped in materials sourced from Indigenous vendors. Some of the books have been marked with the names of lives lost printed in gold on the spines. The books were wrapped by students, staff and librarians during book wrapping events held in March at the Libraries’ Digital Media Experience Lab. The micro gallery installation is part of The Canadian Library project to respect and honour the thousands of missing and murdered Indigenous women, girls, men and two-spirit people


What is the Canadian Library project (TCL)?

The Canadian Library (TCL) is a grassroots art installation project that acts as a memorial to all Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, Girls, Men, and Two-Spirit people (MMIWGM2S). 

The project currently consists of micro galleries installed at various locations across Canada. A micro gallery is a temporary art installation, on a smaller scale, where individuals can see books wrapped in Indigenous materials. The names of lives lost, printed in gold letters, are placed on the spines of these books to individually respect and honour the thousands of missing and murdered Indigenous women, girls, men and two-spirit people (MMIWGM2S). Eventually, the 8,000 books from the micro galleries will be brought together into a permanent installation. 

The stories of the people named on the books can be read on the Canadian Library Project website. The books without names represent those MMIWGM2S who have not yet been found. 

 

The Canadian Library was inspired by British-Nigerian artist, Yinka Shonibar.

Learn more about The Canadian Library and micro gallery

 

Introducing Omni: TMU Libraries’ new multidisciplinary academic search tool

Omni is a new multidisciplinary academic search tool that will enhance discovery and delivery of information resources at TMU Libraries and at our Omni partner institutions.

On June 12, Toronto Metropolitan University Libraries will launch Omni, an academic search tool designed to bring library search and service functions together to provide a seamless, one-stop search experience for users. 

Omni is the name of the academic search tool developed through the Ontario Council of University Libraries (OCUL), which aims to foster collaboration across Ontario academic libraries and facilitate the sharing of collections across the province. With Omniour users can search for articles, books, ebooks, journals and other resources in a variety of formats at TMU Libraries and 18 Ontario university libraries.

“I am thrilled that TMU will soon be going live with Omni.  Not only will this improve the experience of discovery for TMU students and researchers, being part of the Omni network means that we will be integrated into an Ontario wide research collection,” says Mark Robertson, dean of Libraries. “This will radically expand our community’s access to collections.”

While TMU Libraries has been diligently working behind the scenes to implement Omni, the full transition will be phased in throughout the summer.

What does that mean for you? Starting in June the Libraries’ website will switch over to use Omni’s local search function, meaning:

  • Academic resources (books, ebooks, journals, videos, etc.) can be easily searched through one search area. 
  • Access to request items, place holds, check your account and customize your settings, in addition to searching all TMU Libraries’ holding–all in one place!
  • Minimal to no changes in course reserve requests
  • Seamless integration with citation management tools
  • Increased access to books from partner institutions
  • Longer loan periods

Throughout the summer, additional functions will be implemented and communicated along with ‘how to’ guides. 

Once the full transition is complete (summer term), TMU Libraries search interface will be integrated with the collections of 18 partner university libraries across the province providing easy access to over 25 million additional academic print materials for TMU students, researchers, faculty and staff.

Learn more

Omni partner libraries:

  • Algoma University
  • Brock University
  • Carleton University
  • University of Guelph
  • Lakehead University
  • Laurentian University
  • McMaster University
  • Nipissing University
  • OCAD University
  • University of Ontario Institute of Technology
  • University of Ottawa
  • Queen’s University
  • Trent University
  • University of Waterloo
  • Western University
  • Wilfrid Laurier University
  • University of Windsor
  • York University

The Centre for Digital Humanities and TMU Libraries celebrate the launch of Yellow Nineties 2.0

 

On April 18, the Centre for Digital Humanities (CDH) and TMU Libraries celebrated the launch of the Yellow Nineties 2.0 (Y90s 2.0) scholarly website, an online resource dedicated to the study of late-Victorian ‘Little Magazines.’ In celebration of the project’s completion, CDH hosted a full day hybrid Symposium, that included panel discussions and a keynote by Canada Research Chair in Digital Humanities,  Associate Professor, Department of Communication, University of Ottawa and TMU alumna Dr. Constance Crompton (ComCult ’12). This was followed by an evening reception hosted by TMU Libraries, which exhibited its vast and growing print collections in support of the Y90s 2.0 digital editions–collections that have been used for graduate and undergraduate research for over a decade.

Y90s 2.0, nearly two decades in the making, marks the culmination of work accomplished at the Centre for Digital Humanities by Professor Emerita Lorraine Janzen Kooistra and her interdisciplinary team of scholars, students, and librarians. Used in teaching and research around the world, Y90s 2.0 is an open-access resource featuring digital editions of eight late-Victorian little magazines known for their experimental formats, socially dissident art and literary contents, and sexually provocative themes. Produced between 1889 and 1905, the magazines, of which The Yellow Book is best known, were published in contrast to mainstream serial publishing practices popular during the Victorian era, and were distinguished by their design and high production standards. 

Within the magazines, articles, poems, stories and art were printed using “wide margins, decorative devices outside typographical lines, and blank pages separating images and text,” says Janzen Kooistra. And,  while some “titles were connected to trade publishers, others were self-published, or published by a firm formed expressly to bring out a counter-cultural magazine,” says Janzen Kooistra, adding that “Y90s 2.0 and the Libraries’ material collections allow students to learn about a publishing genre that emerged in the 1890s but continues to thrive today–for instance, TMU’s own little magazine of art and literature, The White Wall Review (1976-present).”

The digital humanities project began the process of digitization and encoding the magazines’ images and texts from the Library’s collection of The Yellow Book–a 13 volume serial, in 2005. Five years later, phase one launched with the digital edition of volume one of The Yellow Book, hosted on the then newly released website, Yellow Nineties Online. With the launch “the Libraries, in addition to faculty use, offered graduate level research skill workshops specific to its print collection and online resource,” says Liaison Librarian Val Lem, adding that the workshops are ongoing. Further, the English department uses the Libraries’ collection of magazines and the Y90s site in its required undergraduate research methods course; this too is ongoing. 

Once the first volume of The Yellow Book was online, the remaining 12 volumes were encoded in digital editions over the following five years. As phase one was completed it was decided that TMU Libraries (then Ryerson Library) would take over hosting the site, bringing the entire project in-house. At this stage, the project was reconceptualized and reconfigured as Yellow Nineties 2.0.

Now, with the completion of Y90s 2.0, the project celebrates the late-Victorian Little Magazine as a distinct publishing genre situated on the margins of industrial capitalism and mass print media, and distinguished by avant-garde content, mode of production, and material form.  

Working in collaboration with Professor Janzen Kooistra and the CDH, TMU Libraries Special Collections staff and librarians have, throughout the past two decades, sought to acquire full print runs of a number of magazine titles to support scholarship of the period and the digital humanities project. A total of 8 titles, in their full run, are available in searchable digital editions on Y90s 2.0. Six of these journals are available at TMU Libraries’ Special Collections, an acquisition noteworthy in its rarity. They include: The Yellow Book, The Evergreen, The Venture, The Dial, The Savoy, and The Pageant, and most recently the acquisition of a full run of The Elf.  “Single issues of these magazines are difficult to find, and full runs are exceptional,” says Special Collections Librarian Holly Forsythe Paul, noting “researchers at TMU Libraries Special Collections have the rare opportunity to trace the entire material history of these publications from start to finish, hands-on.” 

The extensive and growing print collection and launch of the Y90s 2.0 digital project opens up exciting opportunities for scholarship and exploration. The online resource features biographies of writers, artists and publishers; includes a database of ornaments to discover artworks; and publishes born-digital research on the magazines. The print collections enable scholars to ground their studies in this avant-garde movement of artists and writers, as well as fin-de-siècle publishing by providing a material understanding of the publications and their modes of production.  

“By enabling scholars to see changes in format, arrangement,  or substrate, as well as editorial content, the Yellow Nineties Collection provides an important resource for understanding the genre and its context,” says Forsythe Paul. With the global outreach of Y90s digital editions and TMU Libraries’ exceptional print collection of late-Victorian little magazines, the University is at the forefront for the scholarly study of this avant-garde publishing genre.  “Students benefit too,” says Janzen Kooistra, “the combined digital/material resources allow them to develop original research projects, which they can publish in digital exhibits on the Y90s Classroom.”  

Library Withhold: Winter term 2024

We hope everyone is having a successful exam period. The winter term is almost complete!

  • Please clear any outstanding fines and return overdue items as soon as possible. Head to the renewals page to see if you have overdue items or fines greater than $25. Students with fines greater than $25 will not be able to view their grades until their accounts are cleared.
  • All fines can be paid to TMU Libraries at the Circulation Desk either by VISA, MasterCard, American Express or with your OneCard. TMU Libraries also accepts credit card payment by phone. Please call: 416-979-2149. We do not accept personal cheques.

If you have questions or concerns about fines or overdue items, please contact Libraries Circulation access@torontomu.ca

Exciting changes are coming to TMU Libraries’ search system: Introducing Omni

Searching for academic resources and managing your library account will soon be a whole lot easier. 

On June 12, Toronto Metropolitan University Libraries will launch Omni, an academic search system designed to bring library search and services functions together to provide a seamless, one-stop search experience for users. 

Omni is the name of the academic search tool developed through the Ontario Council of University Libraries (OCUL), which aims to foster collaboration across Ontario academic libraries and facilitate the sharing of collections across the province.

While TMU Libraries has been diligently working behind the scenes to implement Omni, the full transition will be phased in throughout the summer.

What does that mean for you? Starting in June the Libraries’ website will switch over to use Omni’s local search function, meaning TMU Libraries academic resources (print and electronic) can be easily searched through one search area. You’ll have access to request items, place holds, check your account and customize your settings, in addition to searching all TMU Libraries’ holding–all in one place!

Throughout the summer, additional functions will be implemented and communicated along with ‘how to’ guides. 

“I am thrilled that TMU will soon be going live with Omni.  Not only will this improve the experience of discovery for TMU students and researchers, being part of the Omni network means that we will be integrated into an Ontario wide research collection,” says Mark Robertson, dean of Libraries. “This will radically expand our community’s access to collections.”

Once the full transition is complete (summer term), TMU Libraries search interface will be integrated with the collections of 18 partner university libraries across the province providing easy access to over 25 million additional academic print materials for TMU students, researchers, faculty and staff.

Stay tuned! More to come.

Omni partner libraries:

  • Algoma University
  • Brock University
  • Carleton University
  • University of Guelph
  • Lakehead University
  • Laurentian University
  • McMaster University
  • Nipissing University
  • OCAD University
  • University of Ontario Institute of Technology
  • University of Ottawa
  • Queen’s University
  • Trent University
  • University of Waterloo
  • Western University
  • Wilfrid Laurier University
  • University of Windsor
  • York University